All posts by Taija Anderson

Oh Hi, Yeah, Women Can Be Bad Ass Too.

Remember these faces. Their genres are all worlds apart but the thing that these ladies have in common is that they rock the hell out of a stage. The ladies focused on during Canadian Music Week’s: Toronto Women of Music showcase brought out some of the city’s best talent you need to check out. The showcase took place at the intimate Garrison on Dundas West. The venue was the perfect opportunity to get up close and personal with the future of Toronto’s music scene.

Continue reading Oh Hi, Yeah, Women Can Be Bad Ass Too.

Hidden Gem of CMW: The Bandicoots

Bandicoots - 2jpg_edited-1The Bandicoots—this little surprise came on the second night that was spent at, for all the punkers in Toronto, one of the most anticipated shows at CMW: the Fidlar show at the Horseshoe Tavern. If you live in Toronto and like music, you probably know the venue well. It’s the introduction into Toronto’s music scene. Not so tucked away on Queen West, the scene alternatively sticks out among the various tourist spots. The attraction may come from the good music and catching interior, or it may be that everyone in there is so much cooler than you, thus you become cool by default. Whatever it may be, the trendy depths of the Horseshoe always brings out stellar music. The audience, of course, was shouting and anxious to see Fidlar even before the doors had opened. The head banging and jamming in the merch line was previewing the night to come. Going in without knowledge of the other bands playing brought a pleasant surprise. Continue reading Hidden Gem of CMW: The Bandicoots

CMW: Q&A with Juno Nominated, 1977

A few weeks ago on a, what seems to be rare, sunny Sunday afternoon, I couldn’t be bothered to do much of anything aside from listening to an array of indie videos on Youtube. While I wasted away my me day, the chilled tunes took an interesting turn that had be rushing for my computer screen to see what great concoction was playing. A sweetly bright melody began playing, immediately the song was catchy, but once the singer began I left my thoughts and focused on the uniqueness that is Julie from 1977. The song was called everyday and had been released a few days previous. The sound is a mix of psychedelic indie pop mixed with a dark alternative with some R&B thrown at you every now and again.With the announcement of 1977 performing at Canadian Music Week, The Dakota Tavern May 1st and at Cherry Cola’s on May 5th of course I had to write about the sweetly dark sound that is a great take on ‘60s influenced rock. But who better to explain the sound than the woman herself?

Enjoy my Q&A with Julie from 1977.

1977

Q: How would you describe your sound?

A: Sad songs done happy.

Q: Who are your biggest influences?

A: The Beatles have always been with me.

Q: The EP was inspired by the demolition of your childhood home, what inspired the album?

A: I was reflecting on time, dreams, and relationships.

Q: What is the best part of performing in the city and where is your favourite place to perform?

A: My favourite place to play is my living room. We‘ve got a piano and a drum kit set up in one end of the room so performances can happen at any moment. I’ve been overcoming stage fright so being able to belt it out at home has been helpful because I know the neighbours can hear me and they haven’t complained yet.

Q: The first CD was self-produced, is there anything you’re currently working on for the future? (If so) How will the sound differ or relate to the past works?

A: I’m getting ready to release my third album that I recorded last year. I went into a studio to record and worked with two producers for this one. It’s spashly, crashy, complicated and simple all at the same time. I love it!

Q: What can fans look forward to when seeing you perform at Canadian Music Week?

A: Songs they haven’t heard yet. We’ll play some old ones but mostly we’ll be playing songs from the album that’s coming out later this summer.

CMW: Key into the ’60s inspired sound of Elephant Stone

Elephant Stone is by far the most interesting band you’ll hear at Canadian Music Week. The sitar-inspired psychedelic rock by Rishi Dhir (vocals, bass, sitar, keys) Miles Dupire (drums backing vox) and Gabriel Lambert (guitar, and keys) is what gives Elephant Stone their unique and eccentric sound. The band began in 2006 when Dhir left his old band the High Dials. Though Dhir says their music isn’t genre specific, there isn’t another band quite like them out there. The band’s upcoming performance on May 8th at Hard Luck Bar is sure to leave crowds with a healthy sense of the bands style. The sound is a throwback to the ‘60s with a modern-pop twist. The peppy melodies and chilled vibe of Elephant Stone has caught the attention of media outlets across the world and has granted them the privilege to tour internationally. The hippy-vibe is the bands large focus, despite Dhir admitting that he doesn’t find their sound that “genre-specific”.

“I write pop songs first and foremost… the rest is just window dressing,” Dhir said. After a family trip to India in 1997 was where Dhir first picked up the skill of playing sitar, since then he has become one of the worlds most desired sitar players and has toured with musicians including Beck. At their upcoming performance, the band expects the audience to take “peace” away from their showcase and absorb the “influence of heart and soul” that the band tries to incorporate into their music.

“We’ve been lucky and fortunate to have people around the world that actually value our music,” said Dhir. “The challenge would be ensuring those people know they are all valued and loved.”